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Dutch Influence on New York City

The Dutch Surrender New Amsterdam to the English

The Dutch Surrender New Amsterdam to the English

New York
Monday, December 16, 2013

Before it was taken over by the English in 1665, Manhattan Island was a Dutch colony named New Amsterdam. In this program, author Russell Shorto discusses the often overlooked history of New Amsterdam, as well as the colony's cultural and historical origins in the Netherlands. He argues that despite their relatively short time in control of Manhattan, the Dutch left a lasting influence on New York, which can still be seen in the diverse and multi-cultural city today. This event took place at the New-York Historical Society.

Updated: Wednesday, January 1, 2014 at 2:27pm (ET)

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