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Dred Scott and the U.S. Supreme Court

Dred Scott Portrait

Dred Scott Portrait

Washington, DC
Sunday, June 8, 2014

History professor Lea VanderVelde talks about the landmark Dred Scott v. Sanford Supreme Court case of 1857. Dred Scott, who was a slave, attempted to sue his owner John Sanford for his family’s freedom after they had been moved to a free state by their former master. Professor VanderVelde talks about the repercussions of the decision and why its location in Missouri was very important. Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg gives the introduction. The Supreme Court Historical Society hosted this event. 

Updated: Monday, June 9, 2014 at 9:52am (ET)

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