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Design of the U.S. Capitol Rotunda

U.S. Capitol Floor Plan, 1817

U.S. Capitol Floor Plan, 1817

Washington, DC
Saturday, September 21, 2013

Architectural historian Don Alexander Hawkins explores how the U.S. Capitol was designed--specifically, the rotunda - the central room under the dome. He also introduces multiple blueprints and discusses the Capitol design competition. The U.S. Capitol Historical Society hosted this event.

Updated: Monday, September 23, 2013 at 2:38pm (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)