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Daughters of the Civil Rights Era

Kerry Kennedy, second to the right of President Kennedy

Kerry Kennedy, second to the right of President Kennedy

Oakland, California
Sunday, January 5, 2014

Congresswoman Barbara Lee (D-CA) hosts a discussion with three daughters of 1960s Civil Rights leaders and the daughter of a leading segregationist of the era. Hear from Luci Baines Johnson, daughter of President Lyndon Johnson; Donzaleigh Abernathy, daughter of Civil Rights leader Ralph Abernathy; Kerry Kennedy, daughter of former Attorney General Robert Kennedy; and Peggy Wallace Kennedy, daughter of former Alabama Governor George Wallace. 

Updated: Friday, January 3, 2014 at 10:16pm (ET)

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