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Cubans in New York & the 1868 Cuban Rebellion

General Francisco Vicente Aguilera

General Francisco Vicente Aguilera

New York City
Saturday, November 30, 2013

Cuba’s first war for independence began on the 10th of October, 1868, when a sugar mill owner and his followers declared independence from Spain. Because of a high volume of trade with New York, many Cubans in the United States held powerful positions within the resistance movement - providing financial backing for Cuban revolutionaries. The Cuban exiles, however, suffered from rivalries and infighting so General Francisco Vicente Aguilera was sent to New York to ease tensions. In this talk, professor Lisandro Perez discusses Cuban immigration to America, beginning with the sugar trade in 1823, as well as General Aguilera’s attempts at reuniting the Cuban-American groups during their first of three wars for liberation from Spain. The New York Public Library hosted this event.

Updated: Monday, December 2, 2013 at 11:49am (ET)

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