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Creating the Continental Navy

Continental Navy Frigate

Continental Navy Frigate "Confederacy"

Annapolis, Maryland
Saturday, March 2, 2013

Glenn Grasso, former instructor at the United States Coast Guard Academy talks about the creation of the Continental Navy during America’s war for independence. Grasso analyzes the U.S. strategy of privateering vessels to raid British commerce and supply ships. He also discusses France’s involvement in naval warfare during the American Revolution. The 2012 Continental Congress Festival in Annapolis, Maryland hosted this event.

Updated: Wednesday, February 20, 2013 at 2:38pm (ET)

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