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Confronting Founding Myths - Author Ray Raphael

Worcester, Massachusetts
Saturday, August 17, 2013

Ray Raphael is the author of several books about the American Revolution and the founding fathers. In this program hosted by the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts, Mr. Raphael talks about some of the pervasive myths in American society concerning the founding of the nation, and suggests ways to better tell a more accurate account of history.

Updated: Monday, August 19, 2013 at 11:29am (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)