All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Confederate Winter Quarters Call-In

LIVE on February 8 at 11:30am ET

Re-enacters Drilling on February 8, 2014

Re-enacters Drilling on February 8, 2014

Orange, Virginia
Saturday, February 8, 2014

This past Saturday February 8, American History TV was live from Orange, Virginia with Matthew Reeves, Director of Archaeology at James Madison's Montpelier. He joined us to take viewer questions about the South Carolina Confederate camp located near Montpelier 150 years ago during the winter of 1863 & 1864. He described what it was like at the winter camp for soldiers, officers and their families.

Updated: Monday, February 10, 2014 at 2:24pm (ET)

Related Events

American Artifacts: Confederate Winter Quarters
Sunday, February 2, 2014     

One hundred and fifty years ago - in the winter of 1864 - a South Carolina brigade of the confederate army camped in wooden huts in Virginia on the grounds of Montpelier, the former estate of President James Madison.
 
Matthew Reeves, Director of Archaeology at James Madison's Montpelier takes American History TV on a tour of a reconstruction and archaeology project striving to learn more about how Civil War soldiers lived - and often died - in winter quarters.

American Artifacts: James Madison's Slaves
Sunday, March 11, 2012     

James Madison, the fourth President of the United States & often referred to as the "Father of the Constitution," owned about a hundred slaves at Montpelier, his 4600- acre estate in Orange County, Virginia.  American History TV traveled 90 miles south of the nation's capital to learn about an archaeological project investigating the enslaved communities of James Madison's Montpelier.

American Artifacts: Cemeteries at Madison's Montpelier
Sunday, March 25, 2012     

American History TV travels to James Madison's Montpelier in Orange County, Virginia. In this program we learn about the Madison family cemetery, a nearby slave cemetery, and James Madison’s “temple,” a Greek and Roman inspired structure that James Madison had built in the early 1800's.  

American Artifacts: James Madison's Montpelier
Sunday, February 5, 2012     

The twenty-six-hundred-acre estate of Montpelier was once home to the nation’s fourth president , James Madison and his wife Dolley. It lies about 90 miles south of the nation’s capital in Orange County, Virginia. American History TV visited the site for a tour with Michael Quinn, president of the private non-profit Montpelier Foundation that manages the property.

American Artifacts: Gilmore Cabin at Montpelier
Sunday, November 25, 2012     

The history of the transition from slavery to freedom for African Americans is told at the Gilmore Cabin on the grounds of James Madison's Montpelier in Virginia.  Born a slave for President Madison in 1810, George Gilmore and his wife Polly raised five children on a small sharecropper farm after emancipation.  Built by George Gilmore and his sons, the cabin is one of only a few existing freedman's homes left standing in the United States.

The Civil War: Gen. A.J. Smith’s Guerrillas & the Battle of Nashville
Today     

Texas Christian University history professor Steven Woodworth talks about Union General A.J. Smith’s guerrillas—a contingent of the Army of the Tennessee—and their involvement and decisive action in the Battle of Nashville in December of 1864. This talk was part of a symposium on 1864 and the Western Theater, held by the Civil War Center at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia.

History Bookshelf: Capturing Jonathan Pollard
Today     

Former counterintelligence agent Ronald Olive discusses his book, “Capturing Jonathan Pollard: How One of the Most Notorious Spies in American History Was Brought to Justice,” which recounts the events leading up to the arrest of the American intelligence analyst convicted of selling secrets to Israel in 1985.

U.S. Capitol Grounds in Spring
Thursday     

Architect of the U.S. Capitol Stephen Ayers talks about the U.S. Capitol grounds in springtime.

George Washington's "New Room" Restoration
Sunday     

We go to George Washington’s Mount Vernon estate to see what he called the “New Room” – which, after 14 months, $600,000, and extensive scientific and scholarly analysis, is once again a room he would recognize. The Mount Vernon Ladies Association, owners of Washington’s estate since 1858, believe that a room long thought to be used for dining was actually more of a statement room – one designed to project Washington’s own sense of himself as a gentleman farmer, Revolutionary War general and first president of the United States. We get an up close look at Mount Vernon’s grandest room and hear from the team of historians and curators behind its restoration. This event was hosted by Mount Vernon.

Civil Rights Summit - President Speeches
Sunday     

President Obama was joined last week by three predecessors – Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush – to mark the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which was signed into law by President Johnson. They each delivered remarks at the Civil Rights Summit hosted by the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

Photo Gallery

Book TV (late 2012)
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org