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Confederate Winter Quarters Call-In

LIVE on February 8 at 11:30am ET

Re-enacters Drilling on February 8, 2014

Re-enacters Drilling on February 8, 2014

Orange, Virginia
Saturday, February 8, 2014

This past Saturday February 8, American History TV was live from Orange, Virginia with Matthew Reeves, Director of Archaeology at James Madison's Montpelier. He joined us to take viewer questions about the South Carolina Confederate camp located near Montpelier 150 years ago during the winter of 1863 & 1864. He described what it was like at the winter camp for soldiers, officers and their families.

Updated: Monday, February 10, 2014 at 2:24pm (ET)

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