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Civil War Scholarship

From a Civil War envelope, Library of Congress

From a Civil War envelope, Library of Congress

Atlanta
Sunday, May 18, 2014

Caroline Janney of Purdue University and Peter Carmichael of the Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College talk about the field of ongoing academic research and conisideration of the Civil War. They spoke with American History TV at the Organization of American Historians 2014 annual meeting in Atlanta.

Updated: Monday, May 19, 2014 at 10:12am (ET)

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