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Civil Rights and Oral History

A Japanese American boy tagged for internment

A Japanese American boy tagged for internment

Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Saturday, July 28, 2012

Tom Ikeda of the Japanese American Legacy Project and Jasmine Alinder of the March on Milwaukee digital history project are interviewed at the Organization of American Historians meeting in Milwaukee.  Ikeda and Alinda discuss the historical value of online oral and digital history collections. Mr. Ikeda's project focuses on documenting the experience of the WWII Japanese internment camps, and Professor Alinder is a team member of a project detailing the 1960's civil rights movement in Milwaukee.

Updated: Tuesday, July 17, 2012 at 11:39am (ET)

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