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Civil Rights Summit - President Speeches

Austin, Texas
Sunday, April 13, 2014

President Obama was joined last week by three predecessors – Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush – to mark the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which was signed into law by President Johnson. They each delivered remarks at the Civil Rights Summit hosted by the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.

Updated: Tuesday, April 15, 2014 at 10:22am (ET)

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