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Civil Rights Activist Diane Nash

Diane Nash and Kelly Miller Smith

Diane Nash and Kelly Miller Smith

New Orleans
Saturday, July 6, 2013

Civil rights leader Diane Nash discusses her role as a founding member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, commonly known as SNCC. She sits down with MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry at Tulane University in New Orleans, where Perry is a professor. Ms. Nash helped coordinate the Freedom Rides in the 1960s and reflects on her time in the South; she also advocates for ongoing social change. Tulane’s Anna Julia Cooper Project on Gender, Race and Politics in the South hosted the event.

Updated: Tuesday, July 9, 2013 at 10:50am (ET)

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