All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Causes of the Vietnam War

A patrol in Vietnam

A patrol in Vietnam

Washington, DC
Monday, September 1, 2014

A panel of Vietnam veterans and scholars reflect on the events leading up to the Vietnam War and whether it was a necessary conflict for America. The speakers also discuss what it was like being in the war, both from the American and Vietnamese points of view. The Vietnam Veterans for Factual History organized this event.

Updated: Tuesday, September 2, 2014 at 9:54am (ET)

Related Events

American Artifacts: Gulf of Tonkin Documents
Sunday, August 3, 2014     

A visit to the National Security Archive in George Washington University to learn about declassified documents related to the Gulf of Tonkin incidents of August 2 and 4th, 1964.  Archive Director Thomas Blanton argues that we know much more now about the events that led to the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution & escalation of the Vietnam War than policy makers knew at the time.

Reel America: "U.S. Army Unit Advisor in Vietnam" - 1963
Sunday, August 10, 2014     

This United States Army film features 34-year-old Captain William Johnston and his advisory work with the Army of the Republic of Vietnam from May 1962 to April 1963. American advisors like Johnston aided South Vietnam in its war against communist North Vietnam before President Johnson and Congress paved the way for escalating American involvement with the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution; signed by LBJ on August 10, 1964.  

Vietnam 1963: Revision & Reassessment
Saturday, February 1, 2014     

In a panel titled, “Vietnam 1963: Revision and Reassessment,” four Vietnam War historians discuss the events of fifty years ago in what many consider a pivotal year in the conflict. They explore the political atmosphere in South Vietnam, the country’s changing relationship with the United States, and the uncertain future of the conflict during that year, which culminated in a military coup and the assassination of President Diem in November. The historians examine events through the perspective of Vietnamese and American leaders of the day.  This event was hosted by the New York Military Affairs Symposium in New York City.

Vietnam Prisoners of War Remember
Friday, May 31, 2013     

As part of a three day commemoration marking the return of American POWs from Vietnam, we hear directly from former prisoners of war who recall their imprisonment and ultimate release. And they remember the 1973 White House homecoming celebration hosted by President Richard Nixon on May 24, 1973. Fox News commentator and Republican Pollster Frank Luntz moderated the discussion. The Richard Nixon Foundation hosted this event.
 

"The Big Picture: Why Vietnam?"
Saturday, January 26, 2013     

40 years ago on January 27th, 1973, representatives from the U.S., South and North Vietnam signed the Paris Peace Accords. While fighting continued until the fall of Saigon in 1975, the Accords marked the end of direct U.S. involvement in Vietnam. In the 60 days following the signing of the agreement, the U.S. withdrew its remaining combat troops.  This is a 1965 film titled “Why Vietnam?” produced by the U.S. Army.  This film aired on ABC and in syndication as part of “The Big Picture” military history series produced from 1951 through the 1970s.

1920s Women's Magazines & Writers
Saturday     

American History TV traveled to the Library of Congress Kluge Center in Washington, DC, which was established in 2000 and endowed by philanthropist John W. Kluge. The center welcomes over 100 scholars every year to pursue their research interests at one of the world's largest libraries. We spoke with PhD candidate Sophie Oliver about the fashion, writing styles, and culture illustrated in the 1920s New Jersey magazine, "Charm," and what it reveals about women's social and political interests. 

Lectures in History: Modernizing the Home and Workplace
Saturday     

Vanderbilt University professor Sarah Igo talks about the societal shift that occurred during the early 20th century as as modernization impacted businesses and households. Igo focuses on the literary works of individuals such as Christine Frederick, proponent of home economics, and Frederick Winslow Taylor, who sought to improve industrial efficiency. 

The Civil War: Legacy of Henry Wirz
Saturday     

Author and history professor Michael Vorenberg discusses the legacy of Confederate Captain Henry Wirz, who was in charge of the Andersonville Prison Camp from March 1864 to his arrest in May 1865 for war crimes. Wirz was convicted and executed near the U.S. Capitol building.
 

The Civil War: Changing Military Strategy in 1864
Saturday     

Author Kristopher White describes the way the Union and Confederate Armies attempted to innovate during the final year of the war.

History Bookshelf: Documenting the Great Depression
Saturday     

Linda Gordon, author of “Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits,” discusses the Depression-era photographer’s personal life and the social and political content of her work.

Share This Event Via Social Media

Video Playlist

C-SPAN on Twitter (late 2012)