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Causes of the Vietnam War

A patrol in Vietnam

A patrol in Vietnam

Washington, DC
Monday, September 1, 2014

A panel of Vietnam veterans and scholars reflect on the events leading up to the Vietnam War and whether it was a necessary conflict for America. The speakers also discuss what it was like being in the war, both from the American and Vietnamese points of view. The Vietnam Veterans for Factual History organized this event.

Updated: Tuesday, September 2, 2014 at 9:54am (ET)

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