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Campaign & Election Tactics

Tammany Hall, 1868

Tammany Hall, 1868

Washington, DC
Saturday, December 1, 2012

This event looks at the tactics used by political parties in the late 19th century to secure votes -- with public rallies, newspapers and even bars playing a critical role. Later in the program, you’ll also hear about the first use of the Internet in political campaigns of the 1990s. The Lemelson Center at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History hosted this discussion.

Updated: Monday, December 3, 2012 at 11:05am (ET)

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