All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Campaign & Election Tactics

Tammany Hall, 1868

Tammany Hall, 1868

Washington, DC
Saturday, December 1, 2012

This event looks at the tactics used by political parties in the late 19th century to secure votes -- with public rallies, newspapers and even bars playing a critical role. Later in the program, you’ll also hear about the first use of the Internet in political campaigns of the 1990s. The Lemelson Center at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History hosted this discussion.

Updated: Monday, December 3, 2012 at 11:05am (ET)

Related Events

American Artifacts: Smithsonian Presidential Campaign Collection
Saturday, November 3, 2012     

Smithsonian political curators Harry Rubenstein and Larry Bird give a behind-the-scenes look at the buttons, signs, hats, and novelties in the presidential campaign memorabilia collection of the National Museum of American History.

Lectures in History: History of Political Campaign Advertising
Sunday, August 7, 2011     

One of the most iconic political advertisements in American history was the 1964 “Daisy Girl” spot produced by the presidential campaign of Lyndon Baines Johnson. Professor Robert Mann uses that ad among others in his class on political communication at Louisiana State University. This week’s class looks at the history of campaign advertisements.

American Artifacts: Early American Politics
Sunday, October 21, 2012     

Each week American Artifacts takes viewers into archives, museums and historic sites around the country. The American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts, is an independent research library founded in 1812 by Revolutionary War patriot and printer Isaiah Thomas. American History TV visited the library to look at their early American political collection, including ballots, cartoons and party newspapers.

Politics and Newspapers in the Early Republic
Saturday, July 7, 2012     

University of Missouri history professor Jeffrey Pasley discusses his work as an author, teacher, blogger and former political speechwriter.  Mr. Pasley is the author and editor of several books, including "The Tyranny of Printers" and “Beyond the Founders.”

Women in Politics and the 1970s
Thursday, July 5, 2012     

Democrat Pat Schroeder of Colorado served in the U.S. Congress for 24 years. When she was first elected in 1972, she was a 32-year-old mother of two young children. When she arrived in Washington, she was one of only fourteen women in the House. In this speech at the History Colorado Center in Denver, she talks about the obstacles that women and other minorities faced in the 1970s, and describes her work as a representative at the height of the women’s movement.

History of Women in Politics
Sunday, September 30, 2012     

The National Archives hosts a discussion on the history of women’s suffrage, with an emphasis on the impact of Mary McLeod Bethune. Panelists explore the past and current role of women in government and the gender divide in Congress.

George Washington's "New Room" Restoration
Sunday     

We go to George Washington’s Mount Vernon estate to see what he called the “New Room” – which, after 14 months, $600,000, and extensive scientific and scholarly analysis, is once again a room he would recognize. The Mount Vernon Ladies Association, owners of Washington’s estate since 1858, believe that a room long thought to be used for dining was actually more of a statement room – one designed to project Washington’s own sense of himself as a gentleman farmer, Revolutionary War general and first president of the United States. We get an up close look at Mount Vernon’s grandest room and hear from the team of historians and curators behind its restoration. This event was hosted by Mount Vernon.

Civil Rights Summit - President Speeches
Sunday     

President Obama was joined last week by three predecessors – Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush – to mark the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which was signed into law by President Johnson. They each delivered remarks at the Civil Rights Summit hosted by the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.

50th Anniversary of New York Times v. Sullivan
Sunday     

Decided by the Warren Court in 1964, New York Times v. Sullivan was a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case, upholding the freedom of the press and greatly reducing the number of libel lawsuits. Attorneys Lee Levine and law professor Steve Wermiel tell the story of Justice Brennan’s struggle to thwart efforts to overturn the Sullivan case. Their new book is The Progeny: Justice William J. Brennan’s Fight to Preserve the Legacy of New York Times v. Sullivan. The Newseum hosted this event. 

Reel America: "The Treasury Story" 1969
Sunday     

A history of the U.S. Department of the Treasury, which was founded in 1789. Funded by the Treasury Dept., the film includes reenactments and documentary segments of employees engaged in Treasury activities ranging from the IRS to money printing, to the Secret Service.

Share This Event Via Social Media
American History TV
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org