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British Impressments of Colonial Sailors

1780 Caricature of a Press Gang

1780 Caricature of a Press Gang

Newport News, Virginia
Sunday, July 21, 2013

History professor and author Denver Brunsman talks about his book “The Evil Necessity: British Naval Impressment in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic." He details why this type of forced labor was necessary for the British navy, how it was so successful, and how the controversy surrounding impressments contributed to the American Revolution. This event took place at the Mariners’ Museum in Newport News, Virginia.

Updated: Monday, July 22, 2013 at 12:42pm (ET)

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