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British Burning of Washington

British soldiers burn the White House, 1814

British soldiers burn the White House, 1814

Washington, DC
Thursday, August 21, 2014

Two hundred years ago on August 24th, 1814, British soldiers routed American troops at the Battle of Bladensburg just outside of Washington, DC. The victory left the nation’s capital wide open to British forces, who marched into the city and burned down the White House and U.S. Capitol building. In this program, learn more about the Burning of Washington during the War of 1812 from author and historian Anthony Pitch at an event hosted by the Smithsonian Associates. 

Updated: Saturday, August 23, 2014 at 3:36pm (ET)

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