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Birthright Citizenship and the 14th Amendment

Immigrants arriving at Ellis Island

Immigrants arriving at Ellis Island

Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Sunday, May 20, 2012

From the Milwaukee meeting of the Organization of American Historians, Columbia University history professor Eric Foner and University of Iowa history professor Linda Kerber discuss the 14th amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the "birthright citizenship" provision.  The historians argue that birthright citizenship dramatically changed American history for the better, and that the provision is unique to the United States. Professor Kerber also discusses women's citizenship in U.S. History.

Updated: Monday, May 21, 2012 at 9:40am (ET)

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