All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Birmingham Civil Rights Campaign: First-Person Accounts

Birmingham, Alabama
Thursday, May 2, 2013

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Birmingham Civil Rights Campaign in Alabama. The protests gained national attention after local officials used dogs and water cannons on kids after they took to the streets in what was known as the “Children’s Crusade.” This event features first-person accounts of the events in Birmingham that spring, including remarks by those who took part in the children’s protest, as well as student leaders of a boycott of segregated businesses. The discussion took place at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham. 

Updated: Friday, August 16, 2013 at 10:36am (ET)

Related Events

Oral Histories: Rev. Joseph Lowery
Saturday, April 6, 2013     

This year marks the 50th anniversary of several key events from the civil rights movement, including the Birmingham Campaign and the March on Washington. Lonnie Bunch, the director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, is joined by curator Elaine Nichols to introduce the museum’s Civil Rights Oral History Project, which was conducted in conjunction with the Library of Congress and the Southern Oral History Program at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. We’ll then see an oral history interview from that collection with Rev. Joseph Lowery who, along with Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and others, founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Civil Rights & the “Little Rock Nine”
Saturday, April 20, 2013     

Ernest Green, one of the “Little Rock Nine” -- the first nine African American students to attend Little Rock Central High School in 1957 -- talks about his experience in a speech at the annual conference of the National Consortium on Racial and Ethnic Fairness in the Courts. The school was the site of forced desegregation in the wake of the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision. 

Stokely Carmichael & the Civil Rights Movement
Saturday, March 30, 2013     

Tufts University history professor, Peniel Joseph, talks about his working biography of Stokely Carmichael at the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research. Mr. Joseph argues that Carmichael played an important role in the 1960s Civil Rights movement, working as a bridge between many factions advocating for equal rights for African Americans.

Detroit's Civil Rights Movement, 1950-1967
Saturday, October 27, 2012     

The Detroit Historical Society's Black Historic Sites Committee hosts a panel discussion on the city's Civil Rights movement from 1950 to 1967. Panelists include a woman who was arrested during the Detroit riot of 1967, when hundreds of people were injured and 43 people died.

Detroit's Civil Rights Movement
Saturday, September 1, 2012     

The Detroit Historical Society hosts this discussion on Detroit’s civil rights movement. Panelists focus on the years following the Civil War through the Great Migration, a period when millions of blacks moved from the South to areas north and west. 

Lectures in History: President Richard Nixon & Civil Rights
Saturday, August 18, 2012     

Salisbury University history professor Dean Kotlowski looks at President Richard Nixon’s Civil Rights policies. Professor Kotlowski discusses the dichotomy of President Nixon’s conservative speeches and his liberal-leaning policies. 

Civil Rights and Oral History
Saturday, July 28, 2012     

Tom Ikeda of the Japanese American Legacy Project and Jasmine Alinder of the March on Milwaukee digital history project are interviewed at the Organization of American Historians meeting in Milwaukee.  Ikeda and Alinda discuss the historical value of online oral and digital history collections. Mr. Ikeda's project focuses on documenting the experience of the WWII Japanese internment camps, and Professor Alinder is a team member of a project detailing the 1960's civil rights movement in Milwaukee.

Lectures in History: Martin Luther King Jr. in Birmingham, Alabama
Monday, January 21, 2013     

University of Hartford professor Warren Goldstein discusses Martin Luther King, Jr.'s time spent in Birmingham, Alabama, and the Civil Rights movement there in 1963.

Watergate 40 Years Later: Nixon House Impeachment Hearings - July 1974 Article II Debate
Sunday     

Forty years ago, the House Judiciary Committee held hearings to consider articles of impeachment against President Nixon. We see the committee's evening session debate over Article II, which charged the president with abuse of power. First, Timothy Naftali, former director of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, explains why Article II was at the heart of the impeachment proceedings, and how the committee's vote continues to shape our understanding of presidential power.

Life & Career of Senator Alben Barkley
Sunday     

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks about the life of fellow Kentuckian Senator Alben Barkley, who was majority leader of the U.S. Senate between 1937 and 1947; and was Minority Leader from 1947 to 1949. A Democrat, Alben Barkley was the 35th Vice President of the United States, elected with Harry Truman in 1949. This program is part of a series of talks by Mitch McConnell about former U.S. Senators from Kentucky.    

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN Radio
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org