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Bill Clinton 1993 Presidential Inauguration

President Clinton's 1993 Inauguration

President Clinton's 1993 Inauguration

Washington, DC
Sunday, January 20, 2013

President Clinton was sworn in and delivered his inaugural address during his first inauguration on January 20, 1993.

Updated: Monday, January 21, 2013 at 2:29pm (ET)

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