All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Benjamin Franklin the Entrepreneur

Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin

Kansas City, Missouri
Saturday, December 22, 2012

A look at the life of Benjamin Franklin as an entrepreneur and innovator. Economist Mark Skousen, a descendent of Franklin’s, has studied the founding father for years and is the editor and compiler of “The Compleated Autobiography by Benjamin Franklin." In this talk, Mr. Skousen looks at Franklin as a successful businessman who made enough money to retire at the age of 42. Franklin’s rags to riches self-help book, “The Way to Wealth,” has been in print for more than 200 years. The Kansas City Public Library hosted this event.

Updated: Wednesday, December 26, 2012 at 3:32pm (ET)

Related Events

The Life and Times of Benjamin Franklin
Saturday, April 16, 2011     

Three of the most prominent recent biographers of Benjamin Franklin participated in a discussion at the National Constitution Center. Jim Lehrer, who wrote The Franklin Affair: A Novel, published by Random House, moderated the panel.

Benjamin Franklin
Sunday, September 12, 2010     

In "Runaway America: Benjamin Franklin, Slavery, and the American Revolution," Professor David Waldstreicher asserts that Franklin’s antislavery credentials were exaggerated. He claims that Franklin owned a series of slaves between 1735-1781, complained about the ease with which slaves escaped to the British army during wartime, and profited from the global and domestic slave trade.

Edmund Morgan, Author, "Benjamin Franklin"
Saturday, November 13, 2010     

Edmund Morgan talked about his biography Benjamin Franklin, published by Yale University Press. Mr. Morgan explored the various contradictions in Franklin's personality and the role he played in the creation of America as a republic. The author showed how Franklin was a man who ranked his civic responsibilities over all other aspects of his professional life, including his writings and scientific experiments. After the presentation the author answered questions from members of the audience.

AHTV: The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin
Saturday, April 17, 2010     

Historian Gordon Wood discusses his book, "The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin," which details Franklin’s transformation from loyal British subject to revolutionary and founding father. He also discusses Franklin's writings and his relationship with France.

AHTV: The Compleated Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
Saturday, April 17, 2010     

In "The Compleated Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin," Mark Skousen, an economist and Benjamin Franklin's eighth-generation grandson, describes the last 33 years of Franklin’s life not included in his original autobiography. Skousen examines Franklin's thoughts on his colleagues, his views on sex, and the Declaration of Independence.

History Bookshelf: "Benjamin Franklin: An American Life"
Saturday, May 28, 2011     

On History Bookshelf, Walter Isaacson talks about his book, “Benjamin Franklin: An American Life.”  The book is a comprehensive biographical portrait of one of the nation’s most famous founders.

The Presidency: George Washington & the Frontier
Sunday     

After the American Revolution – and before he was elected the first president of the United States – George Washington retired from public life. During that time, he traveled to western Virginia to check on his landholdings. Author Edward Larson talks about this journey and how it contributed to Washington’s interest in western expansion and propelled his efforts to link the east and west through the Potomac River. George Washington’s Mount Vernon hosted this event. 

JFK Assassination and the CIA
Sunday     

Retired U.S. Army Intelligence officer & former NSA executive assistant John Newman discusses declassified documents and codenames related to the CIA, Cuba & the assassination.  Newman is the author of “JFK and Vietnam” and “Oswald and the CIA.” This is part of an Assassination Archives and Research Center conference marking the 50th anniversary of the release of the Warren Commission Report entitled, “The Warren Report and the JFK Assassination: A Half Century of Significant Disclosures.”  

American Artifacts: Russell Senate Office Building
Sunday     

Opened in 1909, the Russell Senate Office Building relieved crowded conditions in the U.S. Capitol. Senate Historian Donald Ritchie explains why the Senate needed to expand and describes some of the many historic investigations that have taken place in the Senate Caucus Room, including the 1912 Titanic & the 1920s Teapot Dome hearings. This is the first of a two-part program.

Multiracial Coalitions & Civil Rights
Sunday     

A former member of the Black Panther Party, Bill Jennings, joins author Lauren Araiza to discuss multiracial coalitions during the civil rights movements of the 1960s and 70s.

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

C-SPAN Radio