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Benjamin Franklin the Entrepreneur

Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin

Kansas City, Missouri
Saturday, December 22, 2012

A look at the life of Benjamin Franklin as an entrepreneur and innovator. Economist Mark Skousen, a descendent of Franklin’s, has studied the founding father for years and is the editor and compiler of “The Compleated Autobiography by Benjamin Franklin." In this talk, Mr. Skousen looks at Franklin as a successful businessman who made enough money to retire at the age of 42. Franklin’s rags to riches self-help book, “The Way to Wealth,” has been in print for more than 200 years. The Kansas City Public Library hosted this event.

Updated: Wednesday, December 26, 2012 at 3:32pm (ET)

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