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Battle of Fort Dearborn

Fort Dearborn

Fort Dearborn

Niles, IL
Saturday, October 13, 2012

In August of 1812, a battle broke out between U.S. troops evacuating Fort Dearborn and Potawatomi Indians in what is now Chicago. After less than an hour, the Americans were killed or captured-- including women and children-- and the Indians burned down the fort. Author Ann Durkin Keating talks about her book on the event, “Rising up from Indian Country: The Battle of Fort Dearborn and the Birth of Chicago" at the Niles Public Library in Illinois.

Updated: Sunday, October 14, 2012 at 11:07am (ET)

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