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Battle of Antietam 150th Anniversary

"The Battle of Antietam" by Kurz & Allison

Sharpsburg, Maryland
Friday, November 23, 2012

American History TV was LIVE on September 16 from Antietam National Battlefield near Sharpsburg, Maryland, covering events marking the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam.

The battle took place September 17, 1862, and was the bloodiest day of fighting in American history. President Lincoln took advantage of the Union strategic victory to issue the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation a few days later. 

Here’s the full list of guests and speakers:

  • Dwight Pitcaithley, Former National Park Service Chief Historian
  • Keith Snyder, Antietam National Battlefield Park Ranger
  • Kathleen Ernst, Author, "Too Afraid to Cry: Maryland Civilians in the Antietam Campaign"
  • Edna Greene Medford, Howard University History Professor and Co-Author, "The Emancipation Proclamation: Three Views"
  • Mark Neely, Author, "Lincoln and the Triumph of the Nation: Constitutional Conflict in the American Civil War"
  • Helena Zinkham, Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Chief
  • James McPherson, Civil War Historian & Author, "Crossroads of Freedom: Antietam"
  • Harold Holzer, Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation Chairman and Author, "Emancipating Lincoln: The Proclamation in Text, Context & Memory"
  • James McPherson, Civil War Historian & Author, "Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era" and Edwin Bearss, Former National Park Service Chief Historian and Author, "Fields of Honor: Pivotal Battles of the Civil War"

Updated: Saturday, November 10, 2012 at 1:25pm (ET)

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