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Bacon's Rebellion of 1676

Nathaniel Bacon

Nathaniel Bacon

Richmond, Virginia
Wednesday, January 1, 2014

In 1676, Nathaniel Bacon led a group of armed settlers against the Colonial Government of Virginia, claiming that Governor William Berkeley was corrupt and had unfairly taxed the colonists. The rebels also asserted that leaders had failed to defend Virginians from Native American attacks. Bacon’s Rebellion attacked Native American villages, killing men, women, and children, then later sacked and burned the capital of Jamestown to the ground.  After Bacon died of dysentery, the rebellion collapsed and was quelled by forces loyal to the Governor. Park ranger and historian Robert Dunkerly details the origins of the first colonial rebellion against British rule, and profiles leader Nathanial Bacon.
 

Updated: Saturday, January 11, 2014 at 11:24am (ET)

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