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Atomic Bomb Survivors & President Truman’s Grandson

Hiroshima, Japan after the atomic bombing on August 6, 1945

Hiroshima, Japan after the atomic bombing on August 6, 1945

New York City
Saturday, August 30, 2014

President Truman’s grandson, Clifton Truman Daniel, joins atomic bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki to discuss the lasting legacy of the nuclear attacks that ended World War II in the Pacific. It was President Truman who ordered the bombs dropped on the Japanese cities. We’ll hear the survivors describe the attacks as they experienced them – and the lasting emotional and physical effects of the bombings. This event was hosted by the Japan Society. 

Updated: Sunday, August 31, 2014 at 10:22am (ET)

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Related Resources

Washington Journal (late 2012)