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Astronaut Neil Armstrong

Neil Armstrong prepares to step on the moon

Neil Armstrong prepares to step on the moon

West Lafayette, Indiana
Sunday, May 4, 2014

Author and historian Doug Brinkley shares audio recordings and discusses his 2001 conversation with astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to ever set foot on the moon.

Updated: Monday, May 5, 2014 at 10:03am (ET)

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