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Arnold Palmer Receives Congressional Gold Medal

Washington, DC
Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Professional Golfer Arnold Palmer was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in a ceremony on Capitol Hill.  House and Senate leaders made remarks as they honored the four-time Masters Tournament Champion.

The Congressional Gold Medal is the highest civilian award given in the United States, and was first presented to President George Washington in 1776 by the Continental Congress.

Updated: Tuesday, November 20, 2012 at 10:40am (ET)

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