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Antietam National Battlefield Tour

Antietam National Battlefield

Antietam National Battlefield

Sharpsburg, Maryland
Friday, November 23, 2012

Historians Brooks Simpson and Mark Grimsley lead a group on a day-long tour of Antietam National Battlefield, the 1862 engagement that is considered the bloodiest single day in American history. Visiting key locations at the National Park, including the Cornfield, Sunken Lane and Burnside Bridge, the historians use the landscape and demonstrations to show what the battle was like for the armies on the ground.

Updated: Sunday, November 25, 2012 at 3:06pm (ET)

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