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American & Soviet Cold War Spies

Whittaker Chambers, 1948

Whittaker Chambers, 1948

Shepherdstown, West Virginia
Sunday, April 27, 2014

As new information is declassified by the CIA and the FBI, researchers have been able to re-evaluate the lives, motivations and legacies of men involved in Cold War espionage including Whittaker Chambers, Morton Sobell and Morris Childs. This discussion took place at the annual meeting of the Society for History in the Federal Government. 

Updated: Monday, April 28, 2014 at 9:52am (ET)

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