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American Women in Environmental History

Seattle
Sunday, February 24, 2013

Santa Clara University history professor Nancy Unger discusses the role of women in American environmental history from the nineteenth century overland journeys across the prairies to the publication of Rachel Carson’s seminal book, “Silent Spring.”  Illustrating her talk with many images, Professor Unger argues that women realized the dangers of unregulated exploitation of natural resources and were early advocates for conservation and protection of endangered species. This event was hosted by Town Hall Seattle.

Updated: Monday, March 4, 2013 at 10:18am (ET)

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