All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

American Wartime Press from 1861-2014

Harper's Weekly Reporter Alfred Waud, 1863

Harper's Weekly Reporter Alfred Waud, 1863

Washington, DC
Sunday, July 20, 2014

History professor Matthew Pinsker joins journalists to discuss the evolution of the American wartime press -- from the Civil War to the present. Among their topics: the relationship between the press and the White House, and the debate over national security versus freedom of information. This event was hosted by the New America Foundation, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and Dickinson College. 

Updated: Monday, July 21, 2014 at 9:34am (ET)

Related Events

Lectures in History: Politicking in the Early American Republic
Saturday, December 21, 2013     

St. Mary’s College of Maryland professor Kenneth Cohen looks at politicking in the early American Republic. Unlike today, candidates for elected office did not run public campaigns. Instead, they relied on their supporters to make the case for them, using newspaper articles, pamphlets and cartoons either to praise the candidate or disparage the opponent. Some of the earliest forms of this style of politicking used the public’s knowledge of theater to associate the candidates with well-know heroes or villains. Later, cartoons depicted political campaigns as sporting events, often using the imagery of horse racing or boxing.

The Supreme Court and Freedom of the Press
Monday, December 9, 2013     

In this program, a panel of law professors and journalists examine how the Supreme Court has interpreted the press clause in the First Amendment over the years, and impact on these rulings on journalism and free speech.This event was held at the University of Georgia to celebrate the 50th anniversary of New York Times v. Sullivan, the Supreme Court case that strengthened the protection of the press against accusations of libel or defamation.

Former White House Press Secretaries
Sunday, May 18, 2014     

This year marks the centennial of the founding of the White House Correspondents’ Association. As part of their celebration, the Association hosted an event with former press secretaries of both the Clinton administration and the Ford administration, including Dee Dee Myers, Mike McCurry and Ron Nessen. They discussed their experiences in the White House, the difficulties of the job and how the position has changed over time. 

Congressional History
Today     

A panel of political scientists explores questions regarding the history of the United States Congress, such as when Senate floor leadership first emerged and the impact of party politics. 

The Civil War: Fall of Atlanta
Saturday     

Author Stephen Davis discusses the Fall of Atlanta. He highlights the role of the four commanders who had the greatest impact on the Atlanta campaign: Confederates John Bell Hood and Joseph E. Johnston, and Union leaders William Tecumseh Sherman and George Thomas. Atlanta fell to Union forces on September 2, 1864, bringing General Sherman’s four-month-long campaign to a close. The Lovett School, Atlanta History Center & Jack & Anne Glenn Character Education Speakers Foundation co-hosted this event.

U.S. Diplomacy Center Groundbreaking Ceremony
Saturday     

Secretary of State John Kerry and former Secretaries of State Kissinger, Baker, Powell, Albright and Clinton deliver remarks at the groundbreaking ceremony for the U.S. Diplomacy Center. The museum will be designed to demonstrate the importance of diplomacy throughout American history.

History Bookshelf: The Life of Harriet Tubman
Saturday     

Author Catherine Clinton discusses Harriet Tubman’s life and work in this event from 2004. In "Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom," Clinton writes about Tubman's escape from slavery and details her time as a scout, a spy and a nurse for the Union Army.

JFK Assassination: Warren Commission Findings
Saturday     

A week after John F. Kennedy's murder in Dallas on November 22nd, 1963, Lyndon Johnson established the President’s Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy - better known as the Warren Commission for its chairman, Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren. The commission issued its report in September 1964, concluding Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone when he killed President Kennedy, and that Jack Ruby acted alone when he killed Oswald. In this forum from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, a half dozen former Warren Commission staff members discuss their investigation.

The Presidency: Ronald Reagan's Legacy
Sunday, September 14, 2014     

Former President Ronald Reagan died at 93 in June 2004. To commemorate the 10th anniversary, the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Library hosted a discussion about the 40th president’s legacy. Panelists included Reagan biographer Lou Cannon and Reagan speech writer Peggy Noonan.   

Reel America: "Oil Across Arabia" - 1950
Sunday, September 14, 2014     

This Bechtel Corporation film documents the 1947 to 1950 development of a Saudi Arabian oil pipeline constructed by American companies in cooperation with Saudi Arabia.  The 1,000 mile pipeline by-passed the need for a 3,000 mile oil tanker journey around Saudio Arabia to the Suez Canal. This pipeline ceased all operations in 1990.

Share This Event Via Social Media
Washington Journal (late 2012)