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American Wartime Press from 1861-2014

Harper's Weekly Reporter Alfred Waud, 1863

Harper's Weekly Reporter Alfred Waud, 1863

Washington, DC
Sunday, July 20, 2014

History professor Matthew Pinsker joins journalists to discuss the evolution of the American wartime press -- from the Civil War to the present. Among their topics: the relationship between the press and the White House, and the debate over national security versus freedom of information. This event was hosted by the New America Foundation, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and Dickinson College. 

Updated: Monday, July 21, 2014 at 9:34am (ET)

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