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American Artifacts: "One Life: Martin Luther King Jr."

Washington, DC
Sunday, August 25, 2013

American History TV visits the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery for a look at the exhibit, “One Life: Martin Luther King Jr.” The exhibition coincides with the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, which took place on August 28, 1963. That day, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. The National Portrait Gallery's senior curator of photographs, Ann Shumard, guides us through the exhibit.
 

Updated: Monday, January 20, 2014 at 10:58am (ET)

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