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American Artifacts: "A Democracy of Images"

Washington, DC
Sunday, September 22, 2013

We visit the Smithsonian American Art Museum to see the exhibit, “A Democracy of Images,” which marks the 30th anniversary of the establishment of the museum’s photography collection. We’ll learn about the technology, history, and art of photography in the United States, as well as see highlights from the museum’s collection of nearly 7,500 photographs. Guest curator Merry Foresta, who was the museum’s photography curator from 1983 to 1999, is our guide.

Updated: Monday, September 23, 2013 at 9:54am (ET)

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