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American Artifacts: Women's Suffrage Parade Centennial

Airs March 24 at 8a and 7p ET

The Official Program for the 1913 Parade

The Official Program for the 1913 Parade

Washington, DC
Sunday, March 24, 2013

On March 3, 1913 - the day before President Woodrow Wilson’s inauguration - over 5000 women paraded down Pennsylvania Avenue towards the White House in a demonstration for the right to vote. American History TV attended a centennial celebration of the event and interviewed organizers, participants, and historians about the women’s suffrage movement. The aniversary event was organized by Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, whose original 22 founders marched in the parade.

Updated: Monday, March 25, 2013 at 12:28am (ET)

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