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American Artifacts: White House of the Confederacy (Part 2)

Dean Knight in the home office of Jefferson Davis

Dean Knight in the home office of Jefferson Davis

Richmond, Virginia
Sunday, July 1, 2012

This second of a two-part look at the wartime home of Confederate States of America President Jefferson Davis features the second floor of the mansion, where Davis spent many hours in his office, and his children played nearby in a large parlor.

Our tour guide is Dean Knight of the Museum of the Confederacy, a non-profit organization which has owned and operated the White House since 1896.

Updated: Tuesday, July 3, 2012 at 2:59pm (ET)

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