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American Artifacts: War of 1812 in Art & Memory

"Perry's Victory on Lake Erie," Thomas Birch, c. 1814

Washington, DC
Sunday, January 13, 2013

American History TV visited the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery for a look at an unprecedented gathering of portraits and objects representing the major personalities of this little-known war. Curators Sidney Hart and Rachael Penman take us on a guided tour through the collection assembled from the United States, Canada and Great Britain. The War of 1812 technically ended in a draw, but it buoyed American nationalism, birthed the national anthem and Uncle Sam, and anointed a future president in General Andrew Jackson. The exhibit, “1812: A Nation Emerges,” is open at the National Portrait Gallery until January 27, 2013.

Updated: Monday, January 14, 2013 at 10:38am (ET)

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