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American Artifacts: War of 1812 Shipwreck

British Depiction of Barney's Burning Flotilla

British Depiction of Barney's Burning Flotilla

Upper Marlboro, Maryland
Saturday, September 1, 2012

In 1812, Joshua Barney, a retired naval hero of the Revolutionary War proposed a plan for a fleet of American barges to defend the Chesapeake Bay area against the British. In August, 1814, Barney was forced to destroy & sink his fleet of 15 vessels in Maryland's Patuxent River to prevent their capture. The suspected flagship "Scorpion" was discovered under the river mud in 1979 and partially excavated. Now, underwater archaeologist Robert Neyland of the Navy History and Heritage Command is leading a team to further study the wreck. American History TV visited the river with Mr. Neyland to learn about the project, and visited the Navy's Underwater Archaeology lab in the Washington Navy yard where the artifacts are studied.

Updated: Saturday, August 18, 2012 at 12:33pm (ET)

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