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American Artifacts: Underground Railroad & Slavery Experience

A grave marker in Button Farm's historic slave cemetery

A grave marker in Button Farm's historic slave cemetery

Germantown, Maryland
Sunday, August 5, 2012

Button Farm Living History Center is a work-in-progress dedicated to depicting 19th-century slave plantation life. Through their programs and activities they strive to give visitors the experience of working as a slave, and also experiencing the perils of escaping to freedom on the Underground Railroad.  American History TV traveled 30 miles northwest of the nation's Capitol to visit the farm and learn about the non-profit Menare Foundation.

Updated: Monday, August 6, 2012 at 10:53am (ET)

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