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American Artifacts: USS Constitution Museum (Part 1)

USS Constitution Defeats HMS Guerriere (USS Constitution Museum)

USS Constitution Defeats HMS Guerriere (USS Constitution Museum)

Boston
Sunday, August 19, 2012

USS Constitution launched in Boston in 1797 and was named by President George Washington for the Constitution of the United States. The ship gained fame during the War of 1812, defeating British warships in three sea battles and earning the nickname “Old Ironsides.” American History TV visited the USS Constitution Museum, located at the same pier in Boston where the ship is docked today. The museum’s president, Anne Grimes Rand, gave us a tour of some of the museum’s exhibits and artifacts, which trace the history of the ship from its construction, to its role in the in the War of 1812, to the present day. 
 

Updated: Saturday, February 23, 2013 at 3:53pm (ET)

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