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American Artifacts: The Monuments of Gettysburg

Debuted on June 30th at 8:30a ET

4th Michigan Civil War Veterans at Gettysburg

4th Michigan Civil War Veterans at Gettysburg

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Sunday, June 30, 2013

American History TV joined historian Carol Reardon and Col. Tom Vossler to learn the story of the three-day Battle of Gettysburg through a selection of their favorite monuments.

The two have been giving tours of Gettysburg battlefield for many years and co-authored the recently published book "A Field Guide to Gettysburg." This sixty minute tour spends about twenty minutes on each of the three days, revealing the events and people of the battle and also describing how the monuments were designed and dedicated.

Updated: Monday, July 1, 2013 at 8:56am (ET)

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