All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

American Artifacts: The Civil War and American Art (Part 2)

Aired on February 3, 2013 - Part two of a two-part program

Winslow Homer - The Cotton Pickers

Winslow Homer - The Cotton Pickers

Washington, DC
Sunday, February 3, 2013

In this second of a two-part look at a Smithsonian American Art Museum exhibit, curator Eleanor Jones Harvey gives a gallery tour and discusses the symbolism of a selection of paintings and photographs with a group of journalists.

Updated: Monday, March 11, 2013 at 12am (ET)

Related Events

American Artifacts: Liljenquist Civil War Photographs
Sunday, July 17, 2011     

American Artifacts visited the Library of Congress to learn about a new exhibit, "The Last Full Measure: Civil War Photographs from the Liljenquist Family." We spoke with Tom Liljenquist, who explains how – fifteen years ago – his family started collecting photographs of ordinary Union and Confederate soldiers. In 2010, the family donated more than 700 of these ambrotypes and tintypes to the Library of Congress.

American Artifacts: Amelia Earhart
Monday, December 24, 2012     

The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery is commemorating the 75th anniversary of Amelia Earhart’s disappearance on an around-the-world flight. She was called “Lady Lindy” after pioneering aviator Charles Lindbergh, and the mystery surrounding her loss continues to fascinate Americans. We visited the exhibit “One Life: Amelia Earhart,” which chronicles her much-photographed life and exploits. (Amelia Earhart image courtesy of Seligman Family Foundation.)

American Artifacts: The "Hall of Wonders" Exhibit
Sunday, October 2, 2011     

Using works of art, mechanical inventions, and scientific discoveries, “The Great American Hall of Wonders” exhibit examines innovation in 19th Century America. American History TV attended a press preview and toured the Smithsonian American Art Museum show with guest curator Claire Perry.

American Artifacts: Presidential Portraits
Sunday, February 20, 2011     

The Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC includes a permanent exhibit of Presidential Portraits. Former gallery director Marc Pachter gave American History TV a tour of a portion of the exhibit to discuss the art and politics of presidential portraits. The second half of this two-part program will air next weekend.

American Artifacts: Presidential Portraits
Sunday, February 27, 2011     

The Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC includes a permanent exhibit of Presidential Portraits. Former gallery director Marc Pachter gave American History TV a tour showcasing the art and politics of these portraits – with a focus on presidents Lincoln, Hoover, Kennedy, Reagan, Clinton,  Franklin Roosevelt, Lyndon Johnson and both George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush. This is the second half of a two-part program.

American Artifacts: War of 1812 in Art & Memory
Sunday, January 13, 2013     

American History TV visited the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery for a look at an unprecedented gathering of portraits and objects representing the major personalities of this little-known war. Curators Sidney Hart and Rachael Penman take us on a guided tour through the collection assembled from the United States, Canada and Great Britain. The War of 1812 technically ended in a draw, but it buoyed American nationalism, birthed the national anthem and Uncle Sam, and anointed a future president in General Andrew Jackson. The exhibit, “1812: A Nation Emerges,” is open at the National Portrait Gallery until January 27, 2013.

Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall
Sunday     

Historians and law professors met at the University of Baltimore Law School to discuss Mick Caouette’s film “Mr. Civil Rights: Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP.” They explored Marshall’s early law career as well as his work in the South to expand voting rights for African Americans. We also hear about his arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court, and how he became the first African American appointed to the highest court in the land.  

The Presidency: John Quincy Adams
Sunday     

A conversation with author Fred Kaplan about his biography, “John Quincy Adams: American Visionary.” Although he was not remembered for being a great president, Fred Kaplan argues that John Quincy Adams was one of the most intellectual commanders in chief, and also the best Secretary of State in American history. The New-York Historical Society hosted this event. 

Herbert Hoover, Henry Wallace & Cold War America
Sunday     

American History TV traveled to the Library of Congress Kluge Center in Washington, DC, which was established in 2000 and endowed by philanthropist John W. Kluge. The center welcomes over 100 scholars every year to pursue their research interests at one of the world's largest libraries. We spoke with Vanderbilt University lecturer Kevin Kim about his upcoming book about Herbert Hoover and Henry Wallace, and their impact on America's Cold War policy.

Naval Warfare in the American Revolution
Sunday     

Historian Dennis Conrad of the Naval History and Heritage Command discusses how strategies used by colonial naval captains contributed to the success of the American Revolution. Mr. Conrad also describes how ships from the colonies – then called the Continental Navy-- fought not just in the Atlantic but also saw action as far away as the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean. This event was sponsored by the Society of Cincinnati and took place at the Anderson House in Washington D.C. 

Share This Event Via Social Media

Photo Gallery

C-SPAN Gifts (late 2012)