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American Artifacts: The Chinese in America (Part 2)

Debuts May 26 at 8a & 7p ET

Political Cartoon Depicting Chinese Exclusion Laws

Political Cartoon Depicting Chinese Exclusion Laws

San Francisco, California
Sunday, January 12, 2014

In the second of a three-part series, American History TV visits San Francisco’s Chinatown and follows historian Charlie Chin as he tells the story of the Chinese in America to a group of college students. He describes how Chinese migrant laborers arrived in California during the Gold Rush, helped build the transcontinental railroad, and how anti-Chinese sentiment emerged in the United States in the late 19th century.

Updated: Friday, January 10, 2014 at 4:11pm (ET)

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