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American Artifacts: The Chinese in America (Part 1)

May 19th, 2013 Program

Historian & Storyteller Charlie Chin

Historian & Storyteller Charlie Chin

San Francisco, California
Sunday, May 19, 2013

American History TV visited San Francisco’s Chinatown to follow historian Charlie Chin as he tells the story of the Chinese in America to a group of college students. This is part one of a three-part series on San Francisco’s Chinatown. This portion of the series was recorded in the Chinese Historical Society of America Museum.
 

Updated: Friday, June 14, 2013 at 11:33am (ET)

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