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American Artifacts: Star-Spangled Banner

Star-Spangled Banner Exhibit (Artist's Rendering)

Star-Spangled Banner Exhibit (Artist's Rendering)

Washington, DC
Sunday, June 15, 2014

In this program, we visit the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, DC, for a tour of their centerpiece exhibit of the Star-Spangled Banner. The year 2014 marks the 200th anniversary of the British naval bombardment of Baltimore’s Fort McHenry during the War of 1812. The flying of the garrison flag the morning after the barrage inspired Francis Scott Key to write the words that later became our national anthem. 

Updated: Monday, June 16, 2014 at 9:53am (ET)

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