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American Artifacts: Smithsonian Presidential Campaign Collection

Washington, DC
Saturday, November 3, 2012

Smithsonian political curators Harry Rubenstein and Larry Bird give a behind-the-scenes look at the buttons, signs, hats, and novelties in the presidential campaign memorabilia collection of the National Museum of American History.

Updated: Saturday, October 20, 2012 at 11:30am (ET)

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