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American Artifacts: Shaw Memorial

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National Gallery of Art Shaw Memorial

National Gallery of Art Shaw Memorial

Washington, DC
Sunday, March 2, 2014

American History TV visits the National Gallery of Art to learn about the Shaw Memorial which honors Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, one of the Civil War's first African American units.  The museum exhibit "Tell It with Pride" seeks to shine a spotlight on the men of the 54th and the people who recruited the regiment by showing photographs, documents, and artifacts from the time.

Updated: Monday, March 3, 2014 at 9:15am (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)
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