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American Artifacts: Richard Nixon Birthplace Museum

A very young President Nixon

A very young President Nixon

Yorba Linda, California
Sunday, January 6, 2013

January 9, 2013 is the 100th anniversry of President Nixon's birth. American History TV visits Yorba Linda, California and the home where Richard Nixon was born. Docent Darlene Sky gave us a tour of the small house located on the grounds of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum.  The grounds of the home are also the final resting place of the 37th president & his wife Pat.

Updated: Monday, January 14, 2013 at 1:37pm (ET)

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