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American Artifacts: Revolutionary Era Printing

Massachusetts Spy - May 3, 1775

Massachusetts Spy - May 3, 1775

Worcester, Massachusetts
Sunday, April 21, 2013

Each week American Artifacts takes viewers into archives, museums and historic sites around the country.The American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts, is an independent research library founded in 1812 by Revolutionary War patriot and printer Isaiah Thomas. The library's holdings include more than four million items, and its collection of American printed materials prior to 1825 is the most extensive in the world. Next, a look at selected items from the American Revolutionary period. 

Updated: Sunday, April 21, 2013 at 10:53am (ET)

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