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American Artifacts: Prelinger Archives - Part 2

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Image from "Design for Dreaming" 1956 General Motors Film

San Francisco, California
Sunday, October 27, 2013

In this second of a two-part look at the Prelinger Archives, founder Rick Prelinger discusses his project to collect and digitize thousands of home movies & he describes some of his favorite industrial films. Much of the collection of over 60,000 industrial, educational, advertising, and amateur films is available online at archive.org.

Updated: Monday, October 28, 2013 at 2pm (ET)

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