All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

American Artifacts: Prelinger Archives - Part 2

Image from

Image from "Design for Dreaming" 1956 General Motors Film

San Francisco, California
Sunday, October 27, 2013

In this second of a two-part look at the Prelinger Archives, founder Rick Prelinger discusses his project to collect and digitize thousands of home movies & he describes some of his favorite industrial films. Much of the collection of over 60,000 industrial, educational, advertising, and amateur films is available online at archive.org.

Updated: Monday, October 28, 2013 at 2pm (ET)

Related Events

American Artifacts: Prelinger Archives - Part 1
Sunday, October 20, 2013     

A visit to San Francisco's Internet Archive to learn about the Prelinger Archives, a collection of over 60,000 industrial, educational, advertising, and amateur films from the1920s through the 1960s.  Rick Prelinger began collecting the films in 1982 when the switch from film to video meant that many of these productions were being discarded.  In 2002 the collection was aquired by the Library of Congress.

American Artifacts: Early Motion Pictures
Sunday, July 14, 2013     

American History TV visited the Library of Congress Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia to learn about films from the earliest era of motion pictures produced between 1894 and 1912, the "Paper Print Collection." Over 3,000 paper prints were created for copyright purposes, and have been preserved for over 100 years.

American Artifacts: Early Public Affairs Films
Sunday, July 21, 2013     

American History TV visited the Library of Congress Packard Campus to learn about the earliest public affairs films, including U.S. Presidents, the Spanish-American War, World War One, and the first ever political ad, created in 1912 by the Democratic party.  The Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia preserves and provides access to the world's largest collection of films, television programs, radio broadcasts and sound recordings. Our guide is Motion Picture Section Head Mike Mashon.

American Artifacts: 1930s-40s Color Photographs (Part 1)
Tuesday, December 25, 2012     

During the Great Depression & World War II, photographers working for the Farm Security Administration and later the Office of War Information created about 1,600 color photographs documenting agricultural life & war production in the United States. American History TV visited the Library of Congress to learn about the collection from curator Beverly Brannan. 

American Artifacts: 1930s-40s Color Photographs (Part 2)
Tuesday, December 25, 2012     

In this second of a two-part look at U.S. Government funded color photographs from the Library of Congress, we feature images created for the Office of War Information in the 1940’s. Photographers were assigned to travel the United States and document war production efforts.  Our guide is Curator of Photography Beverly Brannan.

American Artifacts: USS Monitor Sailors’ Burial
Sunday, April 7, 2013     

Two Civil War sailors who went down with the USS Monitor ironclad off the coast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in 1862 are interred in a full military honors funeral at Arlington National Cemetery.

American Artifacts: Government Printing Office
Sunday, March 17, 2013     

Open for business in 1861 and located about six blocks from the capitol building, the United States Government Printing Office still prints the Congressional Record each day that the House and Senate are in session. We visited to learn the history of GPO and to see some of their historic printing jobs, including the "Official Records of the War of the Rebellion," which took twenty years to print, and the twenty-seven volume "Warren Commission Report on the Assassination of President Kennedy."

The Presidency: George Washington & the Frontier
Sunday     

After the American Revolution – and before he was elected the first president of the United States – George Washington retired from public life. During that time, he traveled to western Virginia to check on his landholdings. Author Edward Larson talks about this journey and how it contributed to Washington’s interest in western expansion and propelled his efforts to link the east and west through the Potomac River. George Washington’s Mount Vernon hosted this event. 

JFK Assassination and the CIA
Sunday     

Retired U.S. Army Intelligence officer & former NSA executive assistant John Newman discusses declassified documents and codenames related to the CIA, Cuba & the assassination.  Newman is the author of “JFK and Vietnam” and “Oswald and the CIA.” This is part of an Assassination Archives and Research Center conference marking the 50th anniversary of the release of the Warren Commission Report entitled, “The Warren Report and the JFK Assassination: A Half Century of Significant Disclosures.”  

American Artifacts: Russell Senate Office Building
Sunday     

Opened in 1909, the Russell Senate Office Building relieved crowded conditions in the U.S. Capitol. Senate Historian Donald Ritchie explains why the Senate needed to expand and describes some of the many historic investigations that have taken place in the Senate Caucus Room, including the 1912 Titanic & the 1920s Teapot Dome hearings. This is the first of a two-part program.

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

Sundays at Eight - New Book