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American Artifacts: Prelinger Archives - Part 1

Scene from

Scene from "How to Use Classroom Films" (1963)

San Francisco, California
Sunday, October 20, 2013

A visit to San Francisco's Internet Archive to learn about the Prelinger Archives, a collection of over 60,000 industrial, educational, advertising, and amateur films from the1920s through the 1960s.  Rick Prelinger began collecting the films in 1982 when the switch from film to video meant that many of these productions were being discarded.  In 2002 the collection was aquired by the Library of Congress.

Updated: Monday, October 21, 2013 at 10:06am (ET)

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